Dear Abby: I changed my name’s spelling, but it still makes me cringe

DEAR ABBY: Is it rude or disrespectful for someone to change their first name?

Jeanne Phillips 

I’m in my early 30s and have wanted to change mine my whole life. I changed the spelling of my name when I was 12, and my parents legally changed it for me when I was a teenager. But I still don’t like the name, and I cringe whenever I hear it.

Because it’s a common name for someone my age, I’m sure most people won’t understand if I change it. While I respect the effort my parents put into selecting a name for me, I don’t want to be stuck with this one for the rest of my life.

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I don’t want to cause hurt feelings. However, I’m ultimately the one who has to live with it.

Should I do what feels right for me, or must I accept the negative feelings and the disconnect I have toward the name to spare my family’s feelings?

DISCONNECTED OUT WEST

DEAR DISCONNECTED: Many people change their name(s) for various reasons. If you feel the need to do it in order to be a more authentic version of yourself, go for it.

Assuming you have told your parents how you feel about your first name, I doubt they’ll be any more upset about it than they were when they helped you change its spelling as a teenager.

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A word of caution, however. The process may take more time than you would like because the pandemic has slowed the court system considerably. Also, once you change your name, you will need to change it on all official identifying documents, such as your driver’s license, insurance documents, passport, etc., which can be time-consuming.

DEAR ABBY: I realize that social media is a big part of today’s world, and I have no problem with someone using it to stay in contact with family and friends. But at what point is it deemed an addiction?

My significant other spends hours every day scrolling through his Facebook and Twitter pages. I have tried discussing it with him, but it becomes an argument. Now I just sit in the same room with him, silent and waiting until it’s my turn for his attention. How can …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Entertainment

      

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