Utah author takes on the good and evil of Marvel antihero Loki in new YA book


Utah author Mackenzi Lee takes on the task of telling teenager Loki's story in her young adult book “Loki: Where Mischief Lies.”

“Loki: Where Mischief Lies” by Mackenzi Lee. | provided by Melissa Yee, Disney

Utah author Mackenzi Lee takes on the task of telling teenager Loki’s story in her young adult book “Loki: Where Mischief Lies.”

SALT LAKE CITY — Writers have been telling Loki’s story for centuries, but in “Loki: Where Mischief Lies” (Marvel Press, 416 pages), Utah author Mackenzi Lee takes on the task of telling teenager Loki’s story.

Melissa Yee, Disney
Utahn and best-selling author Mackenzi Lee will speak about her new book “Loki: Where Mischief Lies” on Tuesday, Sept. 3, at The King’s English Bookshop in Salt Lake City.

In Lee’s version, she highlights Loki’s desperation to prove himself a hero instead of the villain everyone thinks he is.

“I don’t think anyone is born good or bad or predestined for something — it’s our life experiences that shape us and bring out different characteristics in us,” Lee said. “Thinking of what had to happen to Loki as a young person in order for him to become the older version of himself we’ve seen previously in Marvel was the main inspiration.”

Lee said she was approached by Marvel to write about the god of mischief. “Loki: Where Mischief Lies” is the first in Lee’s historical fiction trilogy, set in the Marvel world and focusing on antihero characters.

In “Loki,” Loki and Amora, Asgard’s sorceress-in-training, share opinions on magic and have become close. But when they destroy one of the kingdom’s treasured relics, Amora is banished to Earth — the place that slowly kills magic — and Loki is left without any magical allies.

When Asgardian magic is detected on Earth, King Odin sends Loki — who believes this to be a punishment — to assist the Sharp Society. As Odin’s contact on Earth, the society is investigating the murders that are tied to the Asgardian magic.

The events Loki experiences and the people he meets on Earth play a part in his journey toward becoming who he’s meant to be. And Loki’s character is especially an enigma in whether he’s the hero or the villain.

“Usually, when we see villains in books, or even when we study the ‘bad guys’ in history, we know from the start where they end up, rather than where they begin,” Lee said. “As a result, we tend to think of their descent or eventual actions as inevitable. It can be hard to remember that stories happen in the present moment — the characters don’t know where they’re going to end up, or what the consequences of their choices will be.”

Loki discovers stories about him that seem to tell the end of his story before he’s lived it, and he struggles with the idea that his choices are already laid out before him. Members of the Sharp Society continue to tell him that he always has a choice.

“Usually, when we see villains in books, or even when we study the ‘bad guys’ in history, we know …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Utah News

      

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