Trump vs. O’Rourke: Scenes from their dueling rallies in El Paso, Texas


trump beto

President Donald Trump and former Democratic congressman Beto O’Rourke spoke at rallies in El Paso, Texas on Monday night.
Trump spoke at the El Paso County Coliseum, which was draped with banners reading “finish the wall” — an apparent update to his “build the wall” campaign slogan.
O’Rourke spoke at a pro-immigrant, anti-Trump march organized by activists, which ended at a baseball field a mile away from Trump’s rally.
Here are some of the scenes from the dueling rallies in El Paso, Texas.

President Donald Trump and former Democratic congressman Beto O’Rourke spoke at rallies in El Paso, Texas on Monday night.

Trump spoke at the El Paso County Coliseum, which was draped with banners reading “Finish the Wall” — an apparent update to his “Build the Wall” campaign slogan.

O’Rourke, who is from El Paso and served as the district’s congressman, spoke at a pro-immigrant, anti-Trump march organized by activists, which ended at a baseball field a mile away from Trump’s rally.

O’Rourke, who narrowly lost his bid for Senate to incumbent Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, is considering a 2020 presidential run. His senate campaign was noted for his ability to raise funds from small donations and energize Democratic voters in a red state.

As multiple outlets pointed out, the opposing rallies were a preview of the 2020 campaign season — which for a growing field of democratic candidates is already underway. (O’Rourke, for his part told Oprah, he’d decide before the end the month whether he’d run or not.)

Trump’s rally began amidst reports that lawmakers had reached a tentative deal on border security, which would avert a potential government shutdown in four days.

The longest ever government shutdown — 35 days — ended on January 25. It began over Trump’s demand for $5.7 billion in funds for his proposed US-Mexico border wall; in an about face he said he would not sign stopgap bills to fund the government without that money. A bill with wall funding could not pass in the Senate, and then after January 3, when the Democrats took over the House of Representatives, Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she would not fund Trump’s wall.

The shutdown ended when Trump signed a stopgap measure to fund the government until February 15.

SEE ALSO: A bipartisan group of lawmakers is racing the clock to reach a budget deal ahead of Friday government shutdown deadline

Trump talks El Paso and the wall — and fact checkers responded

As the Associated Press and The New York Times reported, Trump repeated several falsehoods at his rally.

“We’ve actually started a big, big portion of the wall today at a very important location, and it’s going to go up pretty quickly over the next nine months,” Trump said.

The AP points out, however, that this portion is only 14 miles long and funded by Congress last year. For context, the border is roughly 1,933 miles long — 1,279 miles of the border does not have a fence.

Trump also said that the fencing along the border in El Paso was the cause for lower …read more

Source:: Businessinsider – Politics

      

(Visited 3 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *